Myofascial Release For Pain

 

Self-myofascial release is a popular method used to enhance a client’s myofascial mobility.44 Some of the common tools used in this method are the foam roll and foam roller massage. A systematic review is a type of literature review that collect and critically analyze multiple research studies or papers. A systematic review by Cheatham et al. included 14 different articles that met the inclusion criteria, with a total of 260 healthy subjects, 179 were male, while 81 of them were female.44 The average age of the subjects was 19.6 years, with their ages ranging from 15-34 years old.

 

Cheatham et. al, reviewed studies that examined subjects using the foam roller which were hip range of motion, foam rolling sit and reach, knee range of motion, and ankle range of motion.44 5 studies used the roller massage which were ankle range of motion, knee range of motion, hip range of motion,  and roller massage sit and reach. The researchers discovered that self-myofascial release with a foam roller or roller massage can have short term effects on increasing the joint range of motion without negatively affecting muscle performance.44 Researchers also discovered that self-myofascial release can help after intense exercise.44 

 

Castro-Sánchez et al., designed a placebo-controlled trial to determine the effects of myofascial release techniques. In this systematic review 86 patients with fibromyalgia syndrome were randomly assigned to an experimental group and a placebo group.45 The patients received treatment for 20 weeks, with the experimental group going under 10 myofascial release modalities and the placebo group received sham short-wave and ultrasound electrotherapy.45  After 20 weeks of myofascial therapy, the experimental group showed improvement in painful tender points, physical function, and clinical severity.45 At 6 months after intervention, the experimental group had a lower mean number of painful points and pain score.45 The results showed that myofascial release techniques can be complementary therapy for pain symptoms, physical function, and clinical severity, but they do not improve the postural stability of patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.45

 

A systematic review is a type of literature review that collect and critically analyze multiple research studies or papers. In the systematic review by Beardsley et. al, studies on acute and chronic clinical effects of self-myofascial release were assessed. Researchers concluded that self-myofascial release increases flexibility and reduces muscle soreness but does not get in the way of athletic performance.2 It can also improve arterial function, vascular endothelial function, and increase parasympathetic nervous system activity, which can be useful in recovery.2 

 

A systematic review is a type of literature review that collect and critically analyze multiple research studies or papers. The systematic review by Ajimsha et al. included 19 randomized controlled trials assessing the effectiveness of myofascial release.39 Researchers concluded that myofascial release may be useful alone or in conjunction with other therapies and that treatment effects seemed to be retained.39 Upon further investigation of the specific article reviewed, it was discovered that 11 of the 19 systematic reviews suggested that lack of follow up or use of only immediate follow up measurements may have been limitations to the studies. This makes it difficult to assess the long term effects of myofascial release.

In addition, one of the studies that supported the long term effectiveness of myofascial release was actually a multimodal treatment method including MFR, indicating that this treatment followed the biopsychosocial model. Due to insufficient follow up in 11 of 19 of the studies, the suggestion that treatment effects are maintained may not be supported. Myofascial release may not provide pain relief that can be maintained due to the insufficiency of the results, but ASTR treatment has more sufficient results in showing the long-term effectiveness of the treatment according to several studies.

ASTR stands for Advanced Soft Tissue Release, a manual therapy specialty developed by Dr. Joesph Jacobs, DPT. ASTR takes a holistic approach to treating the source of soft tissue restriction in a way that is virtually pain-free and highly effective.

ASTR treatment has also been used in successfully increasing joint range of motion in the shoulder, neck, and other body parts. ASTR stands for Advanced Soft Tissue Release, a manual therapy specialty developed by Dr. Joesph Jacobs, DPT. ASTR takes a holistic approach to treating the source of soft tissue restriction in a way that is virtually pain-free and highly effective.

 

References:

44. Cheatham SW, Kolber MJ, Cain M, et al. The Effects of Self-Myofascial Release Using a Foam Roll or Roller Massager on Joint Range of motion, muscle recovery, and performance: A Systematic Review. International Journal of Sport Physical Therapy. 2015 Nov;10(6):827-38.

 

45. Castro-Sánchez AMCAD, Matarán-Peñarrocha GA, Arroyo-Morales M, Saavedra-Hernández M, Fernández-Sola C, Moreno-Lorenzo C. Effects of myofascial release techniques on pain, physical function, and postural stability in patients with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial. Clinical Rehabilitation. 2011;25(9):800-813. doi:10.1177/0269215511399476.